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Abigail Hall-Blanco

Abigail Hall-Blanco

  • Assistant Professor of Economics, University of Tampa
  • Affiliated Scholar

Abby Hall-Blanco is Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Tampa. She earned her PhD in economics from George Mason University. While an undergraduate, she was an intern at the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, Louisville Branch. She earned a BA in Economics and Business Administration from Bellarmine University. Abby has presented at the Eastern Economic Association annual conference and has published over a half dozen popular press pieces on economic freedom, militarization, and development.

Published Research

Abigail Hall-Blanco | Jun 2016
This article explores the theoretical roots of Easterly's critiques and relates them to the work of two Nobel prize-winning economists, F.A. Hayek and James M. Buchanan. It explores the broader applicability of Easterly's criticisms by applying a similar framework to military activity.
Christopher Coyne, Abigail Hall-Blanco, Scott Burns | Jun 2016
We examine the failures of the U.S.-led war on drugs in Afghanistan using the tools of economics. By driving the opium economy into the black market, the war on drugs has fostered regime uncertainty, resulted in the violent cartelization of the drug industry, empowered the Taliban insurgency, and contributed to corruption.
Christopher Coyne, Abigail Hall-Blanco | Jun 2016
This paper traces the roots of police militarization in the United States to a variety of foreign military interventions, including WWII and the Vietnam War.
Alexander Salter, Abigail Hall-Blanco | Aug 2015
This paper applies the logic of economic calculation to the actions of autocrats. We model autocrats as stationary bandits who use profit-and-loss calculations to select institutions that maximize their extraction rents.

Working Papers

Christopher Coyne, Abigail Hall-Blanco | Jul 2016
The U.S. government’s covert drone program is a defining aspect of its military strategy in the transnational War on Terror. We highlight a fundamental paradox with the use of drones to combat terrorism.
Christopher Coyne, Abigail Hall-Blanco | Feb 2016
This paper traces the roots of police militarization in the United States to a variety of foreign military interventions, including WWII and the Vietnam War.
Christopher Coyne, Abigail Hall-Blanco | Dec 23, 2015
This paper explores the interventionist mindset required for success under the U.S. government’s foreign policy strategy of liberal hegemony.
Christopher Coyne, Abigail Hall-Blanco, Scott Burns | Jun 02, 2015
The authors examine the failures of the U.S.-led war on drugs in Afghanistan using the tools of economics.

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